Garden Bloggers Bloom Day

Originally, I ignored the tweets and emails about participating in Garden Bloggers Bloom Day. Instead I was enjoying, living & gardening vicariously through my southern blog friends’ posts.  Here in Southern Vermont, we had a glorious amount of snow in December and early January, then a significant thaw and deluge over the past week.  This morning it was 26 degrees, with recently bared and frozen packed ground for footing.

I’m guilty of not fretting about an early spring or unseasonably warm winter because I’m a human-popsicle from October til May.   Also having gardened for 24 years on my property, we’ve not consistently experienced early springs ever.   Lambing photos in April & May reveal that I am bundled in overalls, neck warmer, hat & gloves in the bone-chilling cold of the barn stalls.  Snow in May is not uncommon and what I know for sure is that you should never, ever set your tender annuals out until after Memorial Day.

However, nudged to not be such a curmudgeon, I set out looking for something to contribute and happily discovered premature signs of spring.

This corner of Southwestern Vermont is Zone 5a as far as the USDA‘s Zone Hardiness goes, but around here we are jokingly referred to as living in the Banana Belt.  Microclimate‘s abound, and parts of my own gardens break the zones down even further, depending on the plantings and structures around them.

Happy Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, all!

Daffodils

Brave little Daffodil shoots

Hellebore, or "Lenten Rose", buds

Hellebore, or “Lenten Rose”, buds

Flowering member of the Oleaceae (Olive) family, this Forsythia that I planted last year survived the goat - a greater accomplishment than surviving the seasons!Very excited to snip a few branches for forced February blooms!

Flowering member of the Oleaceae (Olive) family, this Forsythia that I planted last year survived the goats a greater accomplishment than surviving the seasons!
Very excited to snip a few branches for forced February blooms!

Looseleaf lettuce seeds indoors - sprouting at 2 days old!

Hippeastrum, commonly known as "Amaryllis", which my neighbor gave to me at Christmastime, indoor blooms will likely fill my windows in February!

Hippeastrum, commonly known as “Amaryllis”, which my neighbor gave to me at Christmastime, indoor blooms will likely fill my windows in February!

This Post Has 9 Comments

  1. Oh, I’m soooo glad you did share your garden ‘blooms’. Let’s all be brave as daffodils. Just look at them coming up! You have far many more blooms than you imagined. And I am envious, yes, of your amaryllis. I have quite a number of the bulbs in my yard, and get leaves, but no blooms. I’ll work on that. 🙂 Thank you for sharing, and inspiring, friend.

    1. Thanks Curtiss Ann. It’s true – the sleepy winter garden is full of promise! And the past two days I spent a ton of time hauling manure out of the coops/barn to spread on the sleeping vegetable garden. Got my hoops secured for my hoop garden, too. I don’t mind working in the sleepy garden. It is inspiring!

      1. People think I’m funny because I delight in going into the neighboring pasture and scooping buckets of horse manure. Only another gardener understands. 🙂

  2. wow, I love those small daffodil and the amyrillis ! and your winter and spring experience sounds very much like our Danish experience, 2 days after I went digging last week and my wife found the roots for dinner, the soil was back into frozen state ! but small signs of Spring helps a lot, that green color, yummy ! overall greetings Niels, right now back in the North of Norway teaching, fun to be here staying in a hotel where I have been living for years, and now I stop, forgive me !:)

    1. Thanks, Niels, for the visit. It’s neat that you are having a mix of experiences -countryside & cityside. Yes, the frozen garden is inspiring after all!

  3. You gardeners are all the same. We had bare ground yesterday and SNOW AGAIN this morning – argh! The chickens are totally pissed off! They’ve been hiding in and around the barn for weeks and finally, finally, got a good chance to forage about yesterday – I don’t have the heart to open their coop this morning to let in the cold, wet, and white once more. We too had little green shoots poking up into the sunshine while the sun lasted. I bet the little plants are POed as well … covered once more in frosty blankets. Happy Bloom Day … I suppose. D

    1. This was good for a laugh. We got loads of snow today also, yes, the poor biddies. That’s my sentiment as well – they are just suffering through it all, wishing they lived somewhere farther south.
      The little plants are little, thankfully, and that’s their defense. That’s the good thing about a late spring, we don’t typically lose anything that was excited to bust out before it should.

      Well, I love the snow cover because I’d rather see that nice, white blanket than the ugly brown. But I know you detest it. Meanwhile, we both ought to suffer in silence since we’ve already decided that we’re tied to our farm-life! Enough about the weather….(actually, never enough about the weather!)

  4. Still deep in snow here… my GBBD contribution is a bit unique. Your sprouts give me hope that Spring will come.

    1. My sprouts played it safe and it’s a good thing for them! Covered with about 6 inches of white stuff now after today’s storm. So they’re tucked in until it really is time to come out to play! Thanks for the visit, enjoy the rest of winter!

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: